Lifespan of African Grey parrots

African gray parrots have always been a hot topic of discussion among most pet lovers. They can be described as one of the most charming parrots and their wonderful character has won great appreciation as well. These types of birds possess a harmonious blend of extraordinary charm and high intelligence and all these aspects make African grey parrots the most preferred species of all pet lovers. It can be said without any doubt that they are one of the most talkative birds available and these parrots are extremely sensitive as well. They have the inborn intelligence and skills to learn more than hundreds of words and sounds and on an average level, the lifespan of these types of birds stands in between 50 and 70 years.

554074 88730730 Lifespan of African Grey parrots

If you are an ardent pet lover lifespan of the pet will always be a major consideration for you and the long lifespan of African gray parrots definitely represents a very long commitment. When you compare the lifespan of other pets with these parrots you will realize the true significance of African gray parrots and if they are kept healthy and happy some of these birds may go beyond 70 years as well. On an average level, the size of these birds will be around 35 cm or 13.5 inches and as the name suggests, they are gray in color. These types of pets can be classified into two subspecies and they include African Gray Congo and African Gray Timneh.

The Congo African gray parrot can be described as a slightly bigger bird in comparison with the Timneh and they also have bright red tail feathers. The tail feathers of Timneh parrots are a bit darker and their natural overall color is also a bit darker than the Congo (it is not always the case). Another difference between these two categories is that the beak of the Congo is grey and upper mandible of Timneh is bone colored with a dark edge. At the same time, the lower mandible of Timneh is grey and there will not be too much difference between the lifespan of these two subspecies as well. Several factors will have to be taken into consideration while determining the exact lifespan of these types of birds and they include the history of the bird, diseases, lifestyle, stress factors and other related aspects.

321150 7554 Lifespan of African Grey parrots

African gray parrot has the unique ability to talk or mimic noises and sounds and they also possess the skills and capacity for putting the words and sounds into the right context, instead of simply repeating them. The weight of these words will be in between 15-20 ounces and because of their high intelligence, they are often being known as the ‘Einstein’ of the bird world. It can be said without an iota of doubt that these parrots benefit from continued learning and new challenges and various studies have shown that subspecies like Alex has the unique ability to count numbers. In addition to that, these birds can also recognize and label colors and in a nutshell, it can be said that all these aspects including the extended lifespan of African gray parrots make them one of the most favorite pets of all time.

31 thoughts on “Lifespan of African Grey parrots

  1. Glenna Bailes

    My Grey has lost all her down feathers and I can find no reason such as not eating. She is healthy other than loss of down.

    1. jafo

      Spend more time with the bird. And offer some new treats. Also, make sure to put mite filters in your cage, just in case it’s not psycholical.

      Greys love carrots, penuts, strawberrys, and catalope. Feed in moderation, daily.

    2. Dawn

      Glenna, Please take your grey to an avian vet to have blood work done to rule out avian kidney disease. We discovered this too late for our bird and she did not recover. She was only 20 years old when we lost her. She could have lived a much longer life with me had I gotten her to the vet sooner. One sign was very loose watery stools and severe feather picking. Don’t wait to get your bird checked out by a qualified avian vet.

      1. melanie bloch

        My African Grey is 42. He shredded his tail feathers 25 years ago. I started giving him a cooked chicken bone, which he loves, and now gets a cooked chicken wing with meat and bone nearly every day. His feathers grew back and he is like a young bird

  2. ana

    Im getting an african gray tomorrow.. its around 4 yrs old and the owner cant keep her no more due to health reasons.. any advice on how to make her as comfortable as possible to ease the change in moving.. i really want to keep this bird she . Is so cool n smart.. but also scared it may get depress in the change in environment… plz email me any suggestions.. ty..

  3. amanda hill

    I have just lost mine he was 17 years old and i had him since he was 5 mths he niot been ill or any thing he was fine yesterday its killing why he just gone xx

    1. kevin griffin

      Ours just died..12 years old..whole family upset..she was fine singing and morning ,dead ….

  4. Jose a rodriguez Jr

    Hi, I have been with my African grey parrot for over 15 yrs her name is Kyra. She’s very smart and knowsee a lot of words and phrases and sounds. I’m having trouble with her some time when I try to pick her up. My wife just got a new puppy he is 4 months old. What can I do. Thanks for your help and time. Jr…

    1. patricia mcneese

      African grey stress easily . bc of the dog that why she is giving a hard time. My bird get nerves with children. Sometimes it takes longer for them to feel at ease.

  5. Emily

    I have a Congo African Grey. Her name is Molly and she will be 11 in March. She is very, very smart. She puts words and sounds into context. When she senses there is tension in the room, such as if someone is fighting or yelling, Molly will say “don’t worry!”. Also, when she sees someone take a drink of water/pop/etc she will make a popping noise, almost sounding like a can of pop being opened. That’s not all of the intelligent/funny things she does. I love her so much. She is so sweet, funny, and intelligent. I love parrots so much.

  6. jonny

    We hav a grey called jake had him for nearly 20 years.. he is so funny but can b a tiny bit visicious at times.. he also used to talk so much but in da last year he hardly makes noises Now. he dont like new people.. they put fingers in to stroke him but 9 times out of 10 he wil bite.. dont no wots got into him.. any ideas on wots up wiv him ????

    1. patricia mcneese

      Is something diffierentc in your house? My bird if someone comes to visit she will not talk or make sounds until she. Feels comfortable . birds know when a person is nerves with them so they will bite out of fear.


    I really would like to plan for getting an African Grey however, I have an adult son who is wheelchair bound and unable to use his arms.
    He spends most of his day in our family room, where I have one of the few places to set up for the parrot and his accessories.
    Is this not a good idea? I would love all the advice, thanks in advance!

    1. Amy

      When putting the African Grey in a family room you want to make sure you have them in the correct spot. Some birds tend to get very stressed out if there is a lot of traffic going through the room they are in. You will get to realize all the sounds the parrot picks up from the TV. It is very cute. Good luck with your African Grey!

  8. Caroline

    When I think about the heartache I will experience when I have to say goodbye to my beloved kitties in the next few years, I’m just so grateful to know that my baby CAG will outlive me and possibly whichever of my kids takes it after I die. Having a pet is a lifetime commitment, I just wish that with most of them it were longer.
    Oh and yes, we are very careful about the cats around the birds. We know the risks.

  9. mar

    There is a stray African Gray Parrot in my backyard on the tree. It’s been standing in the same spot for over 4 hours now. I have been trying to get it down by leaving nuts and fruits on my balcony, however, it won’t come down or fly away. Is there a reason why it just stay in the same spot for hours.

  10. Tia

    6/25/15 we lost our beloved Paco. He was only 21yrs old. He was my grandfather’s African Grey. My grandfather died 7yrs ago 5/7/08. Paco was the last thing that my grandmother had left….sort of a piece of my grandfather. He mimicked both their voices. She’s heart broken and feels like she has nothing left of him. He was such a smart bird and always loving. (I’m not a bird person but I grew up and grew to love Paco) I hope he’s as happy now that he’s with my pop (he called my grandpa Dad) in heaven. Fly High buddy….we will miss you every day Paco. Xo

  11. John Griffiths

    I have always regretted selling my African Grey Parrot to a dodgy looking bloke in a pet shop in Manor Park for £45.00 back in the mid 70s. Joey was noisy and made a lot of mess. Not surprising trapped in cage all the time. I realise now that it was cruel and birds should not kept as pets but allowed to be free to fly and get food.

  12. Claudio

    My wife and I have had our grey Buffy for 22 years, since her birth. We love her very much but are concerned because we are aging and afraid of what will happen to her when we pass. She is a joyt but a little spoiled. Can anyone recommend a rehoming organization located nearby Las Vegas Nevada.

    1. Oliver mateljan

      I live in Laughlin NV and I’m looking to get an African grey. If your looking for a great home let me know I have plenty of bird experience. Names Jay 702 4206344

  13. Caroline

    I know there is an organization somewhere in the St George, area, but don’t know the name.

  14. Tobi Ramonette

    I SOOOOOO LOVE MY “SUNSHINE” bird. No idea of. Her age. She has had several homes, and a huge assortment of sayings and voices. She is spectacular! She was born with splayed legs, so she can’take perch like others. She gets around alright with the help of her beek, and her happy chatter delights everyone… especially me

  15. Austin

    I just inherited my great grand parents Congo African grey, they passed away at 90 and 94. Greystone is 53 years old. I love this bird, I grew up spending every weekend at their house, and spending all of my summer’s there. I love how he mimics their words and some of their conversations, sounding just like them and knowing that they live on for me through him. He is most talkative in the morning, always the one to wake me up. And he sings me a song every night after I put the blanket over his cage. The same song my gram sang to me at night definitely the best pet you could ever have.


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