Facts and informations

The African Gray Parrot is a vulnerable species of Psittacidae and it is native to the Western and Central African rainforest. It is a medium-sized parrot and its distinctive features are its gray feathers with white markings around the eyes and black bleak. The African Gray Parrot is deemed one of the most intelligent birds and, in contrast with other parrots, it has been observed in its natural habitat even repeating the sounds made by other species of birds. Its cognitive development is similar to that of highly intelligent animals such as chimpanzees and dolphins and even to that of toddlers.

410262 5294 Facts and informations

African Grey Parrot – talking

There are two accepted subspecies – Congo African Gray Parrot and Timneh African Gray Parrot. The former is larger in size than the Timneh, it has light-gray feathers and a red tail. The latter is thus smaller, dark-gray feathers and a chestnut tail. The Congo African Gray is found in Kenya, Congo, Tanzania, Angola and Ivory Coast. The Timneh African Gray is distributed from the savannas of West Africa, Guinea-Bissau, Ivory Coast and Mali. The domestic Timneh starts to speak earlier than the Congo and it is considered less agitated when it is surrounded by strangers than the Congo. The captive-bred Congo usually begins to speak around the age of 2-3 years.

Although the trade with wild-caught African Grays is restricted, because these parrot are listed on CITES appendix II, they continue to be illegally captured and then sold as pets. The US and the European Union prohibits the import of wild-caught African Grays. Their number is increasingly declining also due to habitat (rainforest) destruction, because the trees they depend on for nesting are also valuable for timber. This species is very appreciated as a pet, due to its high intelligence, sociability, ability to learn and reproduce human speech and its magnificent beauty. Scientific studies have also shown that they are able to make the connection mentally between words and their meanings, to express certain preferences and even to apply concepts such as color, shape and number.

Other interesting facts / informations about this majestic bird include its longevity in captivity of 50-70 years and its ability to repeat and interpret all the noises and sounds made by household appliances and even profanity words spoken by its owner. Their impressive mimicry is also part of the fascinating facts about these parrots, as well as their well-developed memory and capability to distinguish a large number of voices. In terms of gender, males are slightly longer than females and the females have a narrower head and a suppler neck.

554074 88730730 Facts and informations

The diet of the wild African Gray Parrot includes fruits, leafy vegetables, seeds, palm nuts and sometimes snails. The diet of captive-bred African Gray should include grains, pellets, seeds, fresh fruits and vegetables and cuddlebone for calcium supplementation. The breeding ability of this species is good and it is compatible with other species equally smart such as Eclectus. These birds lay a number of 2-4 eggs and the incubation period is between 21-30 days. Captive-bred African Grays have suffered several mutations, including albino, lutino, grizzles, white-tailed, parino and incomplete ino (mostly white). There are also a few mutations which have occurred naturally in the wild.

In the captivity, they usually get bored in the absence of proper communication between owner and bird, which leads to feather picking. These domestic parrots have a gentle nature and lovely disposition, but they require constant attention from and interaction with their family members. The most famous African Gray Parrot was Alex , which died in 2007 at 31 years old. Alex belonged to Dr. Pepperberg, an animal psychologist and it was the subject of the Avian Language Experiment. Alex could identify more than 100 actions, colors and objects.

62 thoughts on “Facts and informations

  1. Marguerite Harper (Margie)

    I am getting my baby African Grey next month. My husband and I are wondering
    what sounds they do best. We want to name him something he can say
    really “well”. Is there a book, website, etc whereby I could learn the more
    prominent sounds African Greys make? Margie

    1. Sharon

      I have 3 rescued birds and they say thir own names and each other’s names. Sailor, Sissy, and Jojo. and even the nickname of one Pegleg. I also have known people who have named Baby, Captain. Work with it and it will become quite a talker. Think of words that a 3 year old can say easily is something I would suggest. Two sylable. There are lots of videos on youtude. I keep a radio on during the day when not at home.

      Please make sure someone besides you and your husband forms a bond with your bird. Theses birds live to be 75 years old or so. My rescues are all result of the owner dying and no one being able to care for them. They became neglected and started biting the people who were providing minimal care. These birds are now only about 20 years old. I am trying to determine my plan for their care if something should happen to me.

    2. Munira

      i think a name like max, Alex etc he can pronounce….even long names ! We named our African grey parrot fluffy and he says it every morning

    3. jorge

      Adorable African Grey Parrot & Eggs For Sale.Our parrots are healthy and raised in a pristine clean condition,they are raised in our homes alongside our kids,they are also DNA tested,social,very friendly with kids and other home pets and will make a very good addition to any lovely family. For more information please email us through (jorgebirdshome@gmail.com)or visit our website through http://www.jorgebirds.com/

  2. Sharon Robson

    I have a three African Grey parrots that are all rescued from the same home. The owner died over 10 years ago. His widow gave me one bird, a severe underweight feather picker about 5 years ago, and 2 months ago her kids talked her into giving up the other two because she was scared of them and unable to handle them. Since I quickly got weight onto JoJo and was able to handle her in a short period of time, she wanted the other two to be here. All 3 range in age 16-19 years of age.
    I had no intention of these birds breeding, and this may be a false alarm.
    One of the birds is a special needs bird. Sailor chewed his foot off when younger shortly after his owner died. His foot became trapped in the chain that a toy was suspended on. He does get around surprisingly well for having one peg leg, but does on occasion at night fall off his perch.

    I have been letting the birds socialize with each other since they were all young birds together. They get along well, however I do not leave the house while they are sharing the same area; out of concern that one may pick on another.

    This morning I noticed that one of the females laid an egg. What are the chances that the egg is fertile?
    Can Sailor breed with 1 foot and a peg leg?
    Should I put it in a nesting box ? She seems to be nesting on it on the floor of the cage?

    Your advise would be appreciated.

    1. Joey Renolds

      I have a male and female African grey. Ruby the mail is about 7 years old and my female Paris is about 4 years old. They are in two different cages. I would like to know if and when can I put them both together in one larger cage. Your advice will be highly appreciated.
      By any chance was your parrot named Paris temporarily housed in a pet store in Huntersville, North Carolina? I used to enjoy visiting her there, and was very sad when the pet store closed, b/c I couldn’t visit her anymore!

    2. Harriet Van Eps

      I strongly suggest that you purchase African Grey Parrots by Maggie White. It is the best general and specific book that I have found. Be ready to care for a 3-year-old child. Their ability to process language is however between a four and six year old.
      My adoption of a parrot was a conscious decision. My sister and my mother had both cared for African Greys. My mother’s Pablo was from Mexico City and belonged to a family friend. . . since my mother had been so taken with him, his owner allowed her to borrow him for some years. She developed asthma and allergies and had to return him to Mexico City. My sister adopted a wild-caught Timneh and he had to be toweled as he had been so traumatized. I already had Alpha and when my sister died I took on Paco for as long as I could do it….being bitten many times on the mouth and hands and arms. Eventually my personal Bird Lady, Tani Smida took him in and he has been tried in several different situations. He is back with her now. She provides us with freshly made food which is frozen in large bags and contains an assortment of sprouts, vegetables and seeds and seasoning. They really like hot spicy cuisine on occasion. We supplement that mix with fresh fruits and vegetables and bits of everything we eat. NO chocolate or avocados. Your questions should be addressed to your breeder and she/he should train you. I do recommend that the baby should be handled and bonded with as many people with good hygiene and clean hands as possible as it will make your life easier down the road. We never had Alpha sexed but our bird lady could tell by the grayish tips on her bright red tail that she was female. This was proven as at one point we boarded her with Tani for a week and she was exposed to the presence of some male pheromones and came home in a broody state. She laid 5 infertile eggs and sat on them in the bottom of her cage in a box that she had filled with shredded paper and her own breast feathers. After a month we took the eggs away and she was very relieved. Good luck and be informed that they are the most feathered bird on the planet and create an enormous amount of “dust” from the cuticles on new feathers. Alpha molts twice a year and if you watch a pair of birds together you will see that they groom each others heads and necks. I call this having loving feathers….very necessary as I am now her mate. We also do “fly feathers” while she is perched on my fingers and zoom around the house. I tried letting her flight feathers grow out and NO….she learned to turn corners but always had a 3 point landing. We keep the flight feathers trimmed. She needs a toenail clipping when they become like needles. Your breeder should do this or teach you how. Our bird lady also grooms Alpha’s beak every year or so as needed. They need a lot of chewing on branches and rawhide strings etc to keep the beak healthy and they will also shred your woodwork and or furniture!
      Buena Suerte. Please educate yourself as your baby will live for 50-70 years.

      1. Harriet Van Eps

        P.S. Alpha is 23 years old. It took about 3 years until she totally trusted me. We have had her for 15 years.

      1. Sharon Robson

        Yes it is. We have actually had Macaws found in central IL many miles from where they had escaped during the winter. Quaker parrots have become such a problem in some states that they are actually illegal to own because of the crop damage that developing flocks have caused. Where are you located? Advertise your parrot is missing! Lost pictures with your # and contact information. Contact area vets and animal control also. Hopefully an area cat, dog or some other animal has not injured your parrot. I would encourage you to use social media and any other media available. I keep my birds wings clipped for this reason. If you have a perch that is a favorite for the bird, I would put it out side with food and water. It could be closer then you think. Good Luck!

        1. Mayday

          Agreed. My ringneck was missing for 3 weeks and in this time I came across a neglected grey. 12 months old. No feathers. In the month I’ve had him he’s grown all of his feathers back AND the ringneck was found by my neighbors 3 doors down. 3 weeks! I thought he was a goner. I saw a hawk and heard his scream. Somehow he managed to get away. Now the grey is becoming a model citizen in our household.

      2. Sharon

        I had an additional thought, if possible, place the cage outside, and your parrot may return to the cage that that he or she considers home keep food and water in it. and keep an eye on it. Make sure it is safe from predators Please let me know if you are successful.

  3. Jessica

    I have an African Grey. She is about 8 years old we got her when she was about 3. There is nothing she cant say, She repeats almost every thing she hears. Carries on full conversations and sometimes tricks my kids into thinking I am calling for them. She mimics at least 7 voices perfectly. These are the most amazing creatures I have ever seen!

  4. Cat

    I have a male and female African grey. Ruby the mail is about 7 years old and my female Paris is about 4 years old. They are in two different cages. I would like to know if and when can I put them both together in one larger cage. Your advice will be highly appreciated.

    1. Sharon Robson

      I would see how they react when they can play in the same area when you are present. While they by nature are very social birds; if they have not been socialized you may have issues. I would not house them together until you have a great deal of knowledge of how they will interact with each other. I have a male and female who will hurt each other to the point that I caught them grabbing beaks and biting. Add to that the concept that each bird will view their cage as their territory. For that reason a common playground/gym for play and social interaction would be my recommendation.

    2. Tara

      By any chance was your parrot named Paris temporarily housed in a pet store in Huntersville, North Carolina? I used to enjoy visiting her there, and was very sad when the pet store closed, b/c I couldn’t visit her anymore!

  5. Francois

    I adopted an African Grey. About 25 years old. Can I let the bird out of his cage or should I wait a few weeks?

    1. Sharon Robson

      Yes, however you want to make sure the environment is safe for your bird. Many re-homing groups work with the birds socializing them and getting then used to being handled. I open my cages and permit my 3 greys, out. One will actually leave the cage and venture around the room, while the other 2 will stay on the top of their own cages and flex their wings. All 3 had been cage bound before I got them.

      Make sure there are no fans or ceiling fans on in the even he flies. I also close blinds partially to keep they from thinking they can get through a window. You want to make sure you are able to catch your bird and put it back in it;s cage when play time is over. Remember their beaks are powerful, and if they do not want to go back into the cage, they will let you know. A pair of gloves or a towel that is handle, can be helpful, but I only needed that a time or two with mine. Try to handle your bird and bond as much as you can. Wear old clothes when doing so, because their beaks can do a number on shirts. I like an old flannel shirt that I put on over what I am wearing when we are having cuddle time. Note: It is not uncommon for a bird that has not been handled to bite and bite hard. After they are used to you bonded they will seen to groom you and offer you their food.

  6. heleen

    I have a 5 month old african grey I have him since he was 6 weeks old he never bites me and now suddenly he bites me I can’t even scratch his head so what can be the problem

    1. Sharon

      Mine have always been older rescues; but we have nipped the biting issues. Does he have plenty to chew on while in the cage? I have a couple who somewhat seem to nibble without really biting me. Someone who is not aware would think they are about to get bit. They do the term ‘No Bite’ calmly stated; but I think their nibbling is an attempt to groom my hand as I pet them. These were all skin breakers when I rescued them. They love to chew up stuff. Empty toilet paper rolls, paper towl rolls, news paper, and even rawhide and leater items. Also the letter and number blocks that small kids play with are good for birds. Many baby toys have worked well with my greys. They love attention and to be socialized.

      1. Adil

        Hey, can you please tell me what’s their giving egg month ( summer or winter )? And how many times they give egg in a year? I will be very appropriate from answer

      2. Patricia

        I read somewhere not to use toilet paper rolls since they were used in the bathroom and when a toilet flushes there is a fine mist that escapes (that’s why they suggest keeping toothbrushes covered or in the medicine chest. Toilet paper rolls could have fecal spray on it without your knowledge which would make your bird very ill. Better safe then sorry. Toss them out.

    2. scott

      I have a 17 year old African grey thats lost her red tail feathers. All you see is her rear end, this has never happened before, she does not pick her feathers. Any ideas?

      1. Sharon Robson

        Does your bird enjoy showers and misting? I have heard that they can develop skin issues. Do you have an avian vet in your area? You may want to check with one. I am thinking there could be any number of reasons but a vet could help guide you in the right direct while ruling out some causes.

  7. Miss Ronni KameKona

    My mother’s africa grey is around 27 years old. He has lost his ‘grip’ in both of his feet? Literally, he cannot “hold on” any more. Mother ‘always gave him different sizes of perches in his night-time and day time cages so he would keep healthy feet his whole life? Something is wrong? how do we get his ‘feet’ usage back again?

    Ronni KameKona
    Post Office Box 175
    Everett WA 98206-0175

    1. Sharon

      See if you have an Avian vet in your area. I have heard that one possibility may be arthritis. There could also be other causes. I would try to get the bird checked out, There are some natureal remedies available. It is good to encourage them with different sizes of perches, and playing.

  8. Banisua

    I have four African grey parrots two males and a female as well as one Senegalese, my intention is to acquire more and breed please anyone with experience to share? Am doing it for fun as my daughter loves them so much

  9. Halima Kantharia

    please help. My beautiful african grey is eating only her bird seed and nothing else. Also she is biting anyone who goes near her or him. She draws blood when she bites.

    1. Turtle2001

      I put a male amazon with my friendly female and she bit me several times. After I got rid of him to a pet store. She hasn’t bit me again. It had to be a mating thing. Parrots are not a domesticated animal like a dog.

  10. Mihai

    I am writing from Romania.I have a female African grey,she is about 7 years old.For about 2 weeks she scratches a lot around the tail and she is very agitated and nervous.
    She eats normaly and the manure is normal.(not very fluid)
    The veterinary from my city doesn’t know to much about exotic birds and i live far from a bigger city and i was advised not to transport her for big distances because she could get stressed.
    If someone had the same reaction from his parrot i will be glad to hear an advice or some treatment please.
    I want to specify that i have never had health problems with her.

  11. Issy

    Hi I’m a proud new owner of a CAG πŸ˜€ he’s just too sweet for words, he’s going to be 8 weeks so still eating cereal. I’m starting to try out soft foods for him, any suggestions as to what other soft foods besides bananas I should feed him? He’s out everyday and loves to cuddle after he’s done eating also grooms me as he lays on my chest. Couldn’t have asked for a better pet :)

    1. Patricia

      You posted over a year ago, how is your African Grey doing? It just so happens my husband and I are going to see our brand new baby Congo African Grey tomorrow morning at the breeders. It our first together, my husband had a parrot many years ago. I can’t wait to start training him. I have been reading up all about the bird while waiting for him, likes dislikes what to do and not to do. I think he will eat better and healthier than we do……lol.

  12. Keith Miller

    I have a African grey that i boutgh for my wife as present. She handraised him and he got aal her attention, but since he was in his gage and independend he only bonds with me and bite her. When he is on my hand he or she covers my hand with his /her wings and moves the tail aside as to mate and also tries to feed me. Would this be a thing females or mails do. Is it possible for them to pick up the type of hormones people set of so that the females would be more attrackted to the male and virse verse. We want to get it a mate but not sure of the gender. could you perhaps post fotos of the diffirents in the head sizes. Regards

  13. anaas

    I am writing here if anyone is selling or givein away his or her birds let me know o will adopt my number 0023059855222

  14. Johnson Kelvin

    I have a African Grey parrot, i bought it on the road side, I love parrot alot, I once bought one but it died, My junior brother punished it when i wasnt around, Now i have this african grey parrot, I dont know its age but its a big size, How do i go with it, I talk to it alot but it just look at me, he bite me alot and even dont allow me to touch it, I try be friendly alot to it, I feed it but sometimes he dont allow me feed it, Amazing thing is that this parrot dont eat carrot, He loves feeding on mainly maize(White Corn), Please help me, I know i have alot of work to do on it, How do i get it attention and about the age is it compulsory i know it age? HOW?

  15. Gemma

    I’ve got a 6 month old Congo which I’ve had at home for around a month now. At first he was very upset but after a couple of weeks he’s settled into his new home – but he is refusing to eat anything but seeds & egg (although he is given fresh fruit/vege & pellets every day as well) & constantly wants to be hand fed (although he has been fully weaned for more than a month, as soon as he came home with me he decided he wanted to be fed by hand again) He is friendly but will randomly bite very hard breaking the skin & constantly squawks. And by constant I mean he even tries to squawk while he’s eating. It seems like the ‘hungry baby’ noise but much much louder. Day to day can anyone suggest what I should be doing to train him out of this bad behaviour? He was also talking well before he came home with me but has now completely stopped. Does he just need more time to settle in? I have tried to reward him with sunflower seeds when he doesn’t squawk but this is very very rare & he doesn’t understand that is the reason he is getting rewarded as it will just start again.

  16. abby

    My African grey flew out of my front door, i whistle to him in the backyard and he whistles back, but i can’t see him, and i think he’s scared to come down.i can hear him pretty well, but i don’t know where he is.

  17. ana

    Hi,I’m desperate. My african grey parrot has been sick for over 2 months, i took it to the vet several times, but no avail. In my country there is no vet who is a parrot specialis. It used to be a noisy bird,it spoke alot now it won’t make any sound, just a little. He’s too silent.sometimes it has diarrhea, white froth like waste has stuck to the feathers around his anus.he can’t defecate normally,it seems that all of it won’t come out at once. Also sometimes his neck is swells,the right side, some times it’s ok. When it swells i hear involuntary growling noise from his throat.the same sound that usually comes from an empty stomach. But there isn’t any change in his appetite, he eats normally. He can also fly around home.he’s taking the antibiotic powder for the second time. the vet can’t diagnose his illness. I appriciate it if someone can help me save my lovely parrot,i’m losing him:(

  18. Harriet Van Eps

    Please clip flight feathers and NEVER leave a parrot outside for any reason if you are not with him/her. They know that they are prey birds and prefer a cover….umbrella or a tablecloth if perching under a table.
    That bright red tail is very attractive to hawks, kestrels etc. Good luck and learn from this experience please. Be responsible.

    1. joanne gaston

      Dont clip a older bird, start very young, older grays may have a stressful time and start to self mutilate and it might lead to psycological (sp?) problems.

      Also be warned, when a grey is really stressed the bleed from the eyes. Its common, but i have never heard of it until my grey went to the vet for micro chipping and clung to my shirt because she was in a strange place and strange people and scared. She started to cry blood which almost made me burst into tears, then the vet said its quite common and it was over just as quick as it started!

      Im a seasoned, so to speak, grey owner.

      the vet said that she is the best looking and healthy grey she has seen.

  19. C money

    My parrot is a good talker,but I am decorating. I had to remove him from the room or one day. He has now decided to stop talking.He does not make a sound.what can I do?

  20. Harriet Van Eps

    Be patient. They are sensitive and moody. Speak to him/her all the time in a reassuring grown-up voice and never stop the toys and nurture.

  21. Adil

    Hey, can you please tell me what’s their giving egg month ( summer or winter )? And how many times they give egg in a year? I will be very appropriated from your answer

  22. Loretta

    I have an african grey that was very lovable, he came to me easily and all of sudden, recently he bites me and does not let me pick him up without tricking him, how can I get him to go back to the loving bird that he was?

  23. Mayday

    How old is he? Has anything negative happened recently? When my grey got excited he jumped off the cage and onto the ground and didn’t trust me for a few days. You have to reassure him that you are friendly. It’s like something snaps in their head and says be afraid of everything. In your case it could be a trust issue or he could be maturing. Depending how old he is. they also are less touchy feely when it is molt season and potentially egg laying season.

    1. Loretta

      He is 10. Its been about 3 weeks. The only thing I can think of I was trying to put him in his cage because I was leaving and I was having a hard time getting him down, ever since then he isn’t the same. Will he go back to the way he was or is he ruined forever?

  24. Mayday

    Step 1. Calm down…this is the hardest yet most important. My grey was a plucked at his previous home and just when we thought we solved it he started again. Long story, we solved it but I know how frustrating it can be. Greta can read our emotions as if they can somehow see our mood floating above our heads or something. The feed negatively when you are upset and positive when you are happy. He is NOT ruined forever. You’ve only had him for 3 weeks? That is a sliver of a time in a greys world. They take months to even years to fully trust someone. My guess is something negative happened and he is just reverting to scared mode. Also, he could be testing you. Sometimes they try to see what they can get away with so they know what does and doesn’t work. Do not punish him. Make any time with you pleasant. Do not put him in timeout. It is fine to put him back on the cage if he is biting or not listening but he needs to know that you call the shots. My best advice is to be patient and pretend like it doesn’t bother you but still put things into motin that subliminally say that you are the boss. It doesn’t work the same like it does dogs but they are a smart animal and will make the deduction on their own.

    It’s frustrating. I know. I thought my grey was hopeless. One day I basically just dropped my frustration and said whatever, I’ll love you he way you are. And then BOOM. it’s like he could read my emotions as if they were on my sleeve. New bird. No plucking. No biting. If you still need help and advice get on greyforums.com. People on they have years and years of experience beyond all of our capacities and may have different routes to go. every bird is different so it may take a few trials to figure what works for him. Don’t give up and definately do not even start to think that he will never be the same. He will. Just give it time and work with him.

  25. Loretta

    I have had him for 10 years and he just started doing this 3 weeks ago. Thank you for the light at the end of the tunnel.

  26. Mayday

    oh I thought you’ve only had him for 3 weeks haha. So trust shouldn’t be the issue here. There is a timeline on greyforums that discusses what to expect over the years. If remember correctly the 10 year mark was a marked event for some reason. Check it out. You’ll figure it out. Maybe he’s just rebelling like a tween haha.

  27. Harriet Van Eps

    Hormones for avians are seasonal. Fall and Spring usually. Perhaps he is in the aggressive breeding mode. I suggest you back off and watch his body language. Keep talking to him in soothing words with no expectations as they are a moody breed. It is all a matter of timing. Time of year….time of day and time of attitude and personality. Patience is your friend. Never give a negative response to his snappishness and praise him as the great breeder of all time. He will come around. Admonishment is not the key. Patience and love.

  28. mildad gorge

    All the parrots will be sold with a hatch certificate and ID steel rings (close rung) on their legs and 24 hrs after care service for total peace of mind. I am happy to help with any questions or concerns you may have prior to purchasing regarding cages,housing, diet, or any other concern you may have i will be happy to help. email ..mildadgorge@gmail.com or text 240+317+7848

  29. bestparrots

    we have some weaned, hand fed , tamed and well trained baby and adult parrots and their fertilized eggs for sale. We are specialized in selling fresh laid and fertile species of parrot eggs. All our eggs are collected from very healthy birds in our aviary ,candle tested and confirmed 100% fertile with a hatching ratio of 1.1 . Its quiet interesting raising up your own parrots. Bellow is a list of all the eggs we have for sale WhatsApp number is +44 7778 893319

    Bellow is a list of all the parrots that we have for sale
    with prices:
    african grey =$350 each each (12 left)
    Tinneh Africa Grey =$400 each each (5 left)
    African Citril =$80 each (3 left)
    Senegal =$250 each (5 left)
    cockatoo =$500 each (3 left)
    blue and gold macaw =$600 each (5 left)
    Hahns Macaw =$550 each (5 left)
    citron cockatoo =$450 each (9 left)
    jumbo brown coturnix quail =$320 each (5 left)
    Umbrella Cockatoo =$400 each (8 left)
    Palm Cockatoo =$400 each (12 left)
    Goffin Cockatoo =$400 each (10 left)
    Gallah Cockatoo =$400 each (9 left)
    Sollomons Island Eclectus =$450 each (7 left)
    Cockatiel =$400 each (5 left)
    Conures =$350 each (6 left)
    Catalina Macaws =$400 each (6 left)
    Scarlet Macaws =$500 each (12 left)
    Capri Macaws =$400 each (4 left)
    Harlequin Macaws =$400 each (5 left)
    Camelot macaws =$400 each (9 left)
    Buffon Macaws =$400 each (7 left)
    Hahn Macaws =$400 each (4 left)
    Flame macaws =$400 each (10 left)
    Calico Macaws =$400 each (12 left)
    Military macaws = $400 each (12 left)
    Green Wing macaws = $500 each (12 left)
    Harligold macaws =$400 each (9 left)
    Northern bobwhite quail =$350 each (5 left)
    Leghorn chickens =$340 each (4 left)
    Red Star chicken =$300 each (6 left)
    Sollomons Island Eclectus =$450 each (3 left)
    Dyh Amazon =$400 each (4 left)
    Yellow Naped Amazon =$500 each (4 left)
    Young gallah cockatoos =$500 each (10 left)
    Lorikeets =$150 each (5 left)
    Parakeets =$150 each (4 left)
    Painted Conure =$300 each (9 left)
    Rose Fronted Conure Baby =$350 each (3 left)
    Red Billed Toucan handfed =$900 each (3 left)
    Blue Headed Pionus =$400 each (6 left)
    Dusky Pionus =$350 each (9 left)
    Lovebirds =$100-$140 each (7 left)
    Yellow Eye Canary =$90each (9 left)
    Brimstone Canary =$120 each (7 left)
    Grey Canary =$50 each (6 left)
    Bicudo Male Singing =$1500 each (4 left)
    Dark Capped Bulbul =$150 each (12 left)
    Goldfinches =$200 each (4 left)
    Goldfinch hybrid =$400$650 each (5 left)
    Linnet Pair =$350/pair (1 left)
    African Meyers =$350 each (6 left)
    African Red Bellie =$350 each (5 left)

    Toco Toucan =$3000 each (12 left)
    Conures =$2000 each (8 left)
    ostrich =$2000 each (10 left)

    Bellow is a list of all the fertile parrot eggs that we have for sale
    with prices:

    Blue and Gold Macaw eggs β€”β€”β€”β€”60 available ———– $40 per egg
    Blue Throated Macaw eggs ———– 46 available ———– $40 per egg
    Harlequin Macaw eggs β€”β€”β€”β€” 30 available ———– $40 per egg
    Scarlet Macaw eggs β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”35 available β€”β€”β€”β€”$40 per egg
    Green wing Macaws ————–42available β€”β€”β€”β€”$40per egg
    Hyacinth Macaw eggs β€”β€”β€”β€”-33available β€”β€”β€”β€”$40 per egg
    Goffin Cockatoo eggs β€”β€”β€”β€”10available β€”β€”β€”β€”$30 per egg
    Gallah Cockatoo eggs β€”β€”β€”β€”24 available β€”β€”β€”β€”$30 per egg
    Black Palm Cockatoos β€”β€”β€”β€”-15available β€”β€”β€”β€”$30 per egg
    Umbrella Cockatoo eggs β€”β€”β€”β€”41available β€”β€”β€”β€”$30 per egg
    Congo Grey eggs ——————–70 available β€”β€”β€”β€”$35 per egg
    Timneh Grey eggs β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”-38 available β€”β€”β€”β€”$40 per egg
    Eclectus eggs β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”β€”-18 available β€”β€”β€”β€”$25 per egg
    DYH Amazon eggs ——————–20 available β€”β€”β€”β€”$25 per egg

    M/F Red Sided Eclectus $50.00
    Senagals $50.00 per egg

    Double Yellow Head Amazons $25.00 per egg
    Yellow Nape Amazons $25.00 per egg
    Blue Front Amazon $40.00 per egg
    Lilac Crown Amazon $30.00 per egg
    Green Cheek Amazon $25.00 per egg

    Moluccan $25.00 per egg
    Triton $25.00 per egg

    Hahns $30.00 per egg
    Military $35.00 per egg

    Ostrich Eggs – $100 per egg
    Rhea Eggs – $30 per egg
    Emu Eggs – $30 per egg



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